Museum

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The Town of Cokedale began as a 100 man tent colony in 1899 and was founded by the American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO). The Camp was then known as the Carbon Coal and Coke in Rielly Creek. In 1901 it was bought out by Guggenheims' and the name was changed to Cokedale. Cokedale was billed as the "model mining town of the twentieth century" He accomplished the task by building solid houses, as opposed to tents, bringing in doctors, erecting a school with teachers and constructing a company store. Several different ethnic groups comprised the labor force.In its heyday, there were over 1500 miners living in the camp and 23 different languages spoken.The miners in Cokedale never unionized, however, they were not immune from the same issues which plagued the northern miners, long hours, bad working conditions, being paid in scrip, (which could only be spent at the company store),as well as being at the mercy of the weighman. They experienced many of the same conditions which led up to the Ludlow Massacre in 1913. The Camp thrived until the mine played out in 1947. What makes Cokedale unique is it is one of the few camps left largely intact to include the coking ovens located across the highway. The Town boasts a Museum located in the original Mercantile building. Visitors are invited to step a century back in time. Tours are available by appointment only, those interested in experiencing the mining culture can call Museum Director Dave Harris at 719-859-3452. Admission is free and the Museum operates solely off of donations. 

 merchantile building image